Happy 25th Birthday Cartoon Network!

Happy 25th Birthday Cartoon Network!

Happy 25th Birthday Cartoon Network!

Today (01/10/2017) is the big day, twenty-five years today (1st October 1992), Cartoon Network – the world’s first 24 hour channel focusing purely on animation first hit the airwaves in the United States. The blog post is a continuation of the Hanna-Barbera 60th Birthday post I wrote on 7th July (which was part one), where I briefly mentioned how the channel came into fruition, more specifically this post will cover the channel’s history between 1992 to 1999, with two more parts coming later this month. Before I start, I must mention that I don’t live in the United States, however when Cartoon Network launched in the United Kingdom in 1993, it did share a lot of similarities to the original U.S. version including programming blocks, presentation and of course, the shows, it was only up until 1999-2003 when things started to become more localised.

Part 1: https://www.regularcapital.com/2017/07/happy-60th-birthday-hanna-barbera/

At launch, Cartoon Network first aired the national anthem of the United States – “The Star Spangled Banner”, which was a long running tradition of when a new channel from Turner Broadcasting is launched, the first programme to air was “Droopy’s Guide To Cartoon Network” which was an introduction to the channel. The first actual cartoon to air on the channel was a Looney Tunes cartoon named “The Great Piggy Bank Robbery”, at the time, Cartoon Network’s owner – Turner only owned Warner Bros.’s pre-July 1948 cartoons, the whole MGM animation library and also Fleischer’s/Famous’s library. This huge library allowed the channel to run for a few years without the addition of new original content, and it was an opportunity for the new generation of kids at the time to watch some classic cartoons they’ve never seen before. I was born in 1989, so I can remember Cartoon Network’s early days and by 1993 (just before the European launch), I already had cable. During 1993-1999 era, Looney Tunes and Tom and Jerry shorts were given plenty of airtime.

Also during this time, I remember watching The Flintstones, Scooby-Doo!, Yogi Bear, Top Cat, The Jetsons and many more. The USA version and UK version (which was shared with the rest of Europe in different audio languages) of the channel had quite a few programming blocks, including “Super Chunk” which was a marathon block featuring a particular show, there was also “Toonheads” which was a show where they air animated shorts with trivia. There was also breakfast-time block called “The Morning Crew” and also the “Boomerang” block which became a spin-off channel in the year 2000 and became a home for classic cartoons as by then Cartoon Network was focusing more on their own original programming. There was the “Power Zone” block which focused on action animation and was a precursor to Toonami.

The first original show to air on Cartoon Network was “The Moxy Show”, though it was just an anthology show with additional clips made in 3D CGI. The first full production was Space Ghost: Coast To Coast, the series was unusual as it was a reboot of the 1960’s Space Ghost superhero cartoon but reformatted as a spoof talk show, the show featured interviews with high-profile celebrities. The show laid the foundation for Cartoon Network’s future night long block for young adults – Adult Swim which eventually launched in 2001. Also, alongside Space Ghost: Coast to Coast were two new productions from Hanna-Barbera – the animated comedy – 2 Stupid Dogs and much later in 1996 – The Real Adventures of Jonny Quest. In 1995, Cartoon Network aired “World Premiere Toons”, which aired new pilots from Hanna-Barbera and occasionally from other studios, World Premiere Toons (which later became the “What A Cartoon Show”). The Powerpuff Girls, Dexter’s Laboratory, Cow and Chicken, Courage The Cowardly Dog and Johnny Bravo all had their debut in the World Premiere Toons block.

After the merger with Time Warner in 1996, Cartoon Network was now able to access the rest of Warner Bros. Animation’s library, this includes the post-1948 Looney Tunes shorts, plus also recent hits at the time including Tiny Toon Adventures, Batman: The Animated Series, Animaniacs, Freakazoid!, Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries and Pinky and the Brain. In terms of original content, 1996-1999 was a turning point in Cartoon Network’s history, the network’s attention has shifted over to original content, a full series of Dexter’s Laboratory premiered in 1996, later in 1997 came Cow and Chicken and Johnny Bravo, in 1998, came a full series of The Powerpuff Girls and in 1999, Courage The Cowardly Dog. In 1999, Cartoon Network USA launched a new block which became a cornerstone of the network – Cartoon Cartoon Fridays, a programming block that’s purely dedicated to the channel’s original programming and also new episodes.

Today (01/10/2017), Cartoon Network USA started up this morning at 6am ET/PT with a lengthy one and half minute colourful dance montage featuring its most famous characters throughout its 25 year history:

The blog post forms a part of this blog’s celebrations for Cartoon Network’s 25th Anniversary, part three will be about the era between 2000 to 2006.

http://www.cartoonnetwork.com
http://www.cartoonnetworkstudios.com
http://www.warnerbros.com
http://www.timewarner.com

Happy 60th Birthday Hanna-Barbera

Happy 60th Birthday Hanna-Barbera

Happy 60th Birthday Hanna-Barbera: The Animation Studio That Started It All And Entertained Kids (And Adults) For Six Decades

Today, 60 years ago on 7th July 1957, the creators of Tom and Jerry – William Hanna and Joseph Barbera opened their very own animation studio. The new studio known as Hanna-Barbera (a combination of the founder’s surnames) was groundbreaking as it was one of the few animation studios that specifically made animated TV shows at the time, before Hanna-Barbera, most animation that aired on television were theatrical shorts. Hanna and Barbera were pioneers in the animation industry (and the media industry as a whole) and created cartoons that were both high-quality and affordable for television broadcasters. On 14th December 1957, Hanna-Barbera’s first ever production – The Ruff and Reddy Show aired on NBC in the United States, an animated show about two friends, a cat named Ruff and a dog named Reddy. It only took two months to get a studio running after the closure of the animation unit at Tom and Jerry’s animation studio – MGM and with the help of a director named George Sydney, a friend of Hanna and Barbera, they were able to reach a deal with Screen Gems (a part of Columbia Pictures), the deal laid a solid foundation for the new studio.

The Huckleberry Hound Show was the studio’s first big hit which premiered in 1958, Yogi Bear soon followed with his own show in 1961, also Top Cat debuted in 1961. The most important milestone (pun intended) for Hanna-Barbera was The Flintstones, based on the sitcom – The Honeymooners but in a stone age setting, the show was the studio’s biggest primetime hit and made Fred Flintstone and Hanna-Barbera a household name. Before Fox’s The Simpsons broke the record – The Flintstones was the longest running animated sitcom in the world, and aired between 1960 to 1966, quite an achievement considering this was still the early days of television animation. In 1962, came The Jetsons, which followed a similar formula to The Flintstones but this time in a futuristic setting.

In 1963, Hanna-Barbera Studios moved to their new state-of-the-art studios at 3400 Cahuenga Boulevard West in Hollywood, Los Angeles, after the studio’s opening, the science-fiction adventure show Jonny Quest and The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show soon followed, along with Wacky Races (which has been rebooted by Warner Bros. Animation) and its spinoff series’ The Perils of Penelope Pitstop and Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines in the late 1960’s.

At the start of the 1970’s, Hanna-Barbera controlled 80% of the children’s programming in the United States, by this point it was the biggest animation company in the world, Disney may of ruled the theatrical animation business (and arguably still does), but Hanna-Barbera ruled children’s television, the very form of audiovisual media that kids were most exposed to in their own homes.

In 1970’s the studio was in full-production, with Josie and the Pussycats, Help!… It’s the Hair Bear Bunch!, Hong Kong Phooey, Captain Caveman being produced, but the most influential cartoon that was produced at Hanna-Barbera (and still being produced today with several re-versions and movies) is Scooby-Doo!, created by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears in 1969, the series remains to be one of Boomerang’s biggest hits (alongside Tom and Jerry). Scooby-Doo! centres on four teenagers and the eponymous talking Great Dane who go solving spooky supernatural mysteries.

In the 1980’s, the studio started to decline, but it wasn’t all doom and gloom though, aside the odd spinoff and prequel such as The Flintstone Kids and The New Scooby and Scrappy-Doo Show, there was one hit that stood out – The Smurfs, an animated show about small blue human-like creatures that live in a forest, the show’s concept wasn’t created by Hanna-Barbera but rather by the Belgian cartoonist Peyo (real name Pierre Culliford).

The studio changed ownership a few times, but it wasn’t until 1991 that will completely change the course of the studio’s history and it’s so important that if it didn’t happen I wouldn’t be writing this blog today – Turner Broadcasting System brought 50% of the studio (as well as the all important archive) with the Apollo Investment Fund, at the time, Turner already owned the MGM catalogue which includes Tom and Jerry and for the first time the studio’s IP’s and Tom and Jerry are united under one company. In 1994, Turner fully owned the studio.

Both, William Hanna and Joseph Barbera carried on at the studio as creative consultants. The studio hired new animators, most notably – Craig McCracken (The Powerpuff Girls), Donovan Cook (2 Stupid Dogs), Genndy Tartakovsky (Dexter’s Laboratory), David Feiss (Cow and Chicken), Seth MacFarlane (worked on multiple productions as well as his What A Cartoon! animated short – Larry and Steve which was the prototype for his later creation – Family Guy), Van Partible (creator of Johnny Bravo) and Butch Hartman (worked on several shows at Hanna-Barbera, later created The Fairly OddParents for Frederator and Nickelodeon).

Turner Broadcasting System hired Fred Seibert as the president of Hanna-Barbera and to oversee its What A Cartoon! animated short development programme, Seibert later founded Frederator Studios, the co-producer of Cartoon Network’s Adventure Time. During this time Cartoon Network Studios was only a brand name used by Hanna-Barbera.

People were originally sceptical of Ted Turner’s 24-hour news network CNN (Cable News Network) before it launched, but he proved the critics wrong, and he was about to prove them wrong yet again, Turner Broadcasting System Inc. or TBS for short decided to make use of its newly acquired catalogue of animated shows from Hanna-Barbera and MGM as well as new productions from the new studio, finally in the United States on 1st October 1992, the newest network from TBS – Cartoon Network launched, the world’s first ever 24-hour channel dedicated to nothing but cartoons. Cartoon Network quickly spread internationally with a focus on distribution as opposed to full-localisation, with the Latin American version launching in April 1993, the European launch in September 1993 from TBS’s base in London and the Asian feed launching in 1994.

Luckily, Cartoon Network already had a large library of cartoons to keep the channel going during its formative years while production on new shows such as Dexter’s Laboratory and Cow and Chicken were on-going. The 1996 merger between TBS and Time Warner was also important, especially as Cartoon Network now has full access to one of the biggest movie studios in Hollywood – Warner Bros. as well as content from Warner’s post-1948 animation library (Turner already owned the pre-1948 library). By 2001, Hanna-Barbera ceased to exist in its own right within the media conglomerate, with Warner Bros. Animation owning the Hanna-Barbera name and archive. Warner Bros. Animation is now responsible for modern remakes of its animated classics such as Be Cool, Scooby-Doo.

Sadly, William Hanna died in 2001, Joseph Barbera remained at Warner Bros. Animation as an executive producer and director until his death in 2006. William Hanna’s and Joseph Barbera’s studio and their legacy continues to this very day, the studio itself was renamed Cartoon Network Studios and continues to produce many of your favourite cartoons. There is so much to write about the history of Hanna-Barbera and Cartoon Network, so I’m leaving part two for the channel’s 25th Anniversary on 1st October this year. Hanna-Barbera has produced some of the most loved cartoon characters, its influence is still present today and it will carry on well into the future.

http://www.cartoonnetworkstudios.com
http://www.warnerbros.com
http://www.timewarner.com

Tooncast Latin America May 2017 And June 2017 Highlights

Tooncast Latin America May 2017 And June 2017 Highlights

Tooncast Latin America May 2017 And June 2017 Highlights

Tooncast Latin America May 2017 Highlights

Family Month

Featuring episodes of two of the most famous cartoon families of all time: The Jetsons and The Flintstones airing all through May, airing Mondays to Fridays at 6am and 6pm and weekends at 1pm.

The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones: Crossover Special Movie

The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones Movie airs Friday 26th May at 8pm.

Yogi’s Ark Lark Movie

Yogi’s Ark Lark airs Monday 1st May at 9pm.

Tooncast Highlights For May 2017 in .docx Format

English: https://www.regularcapital.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/TOONLA_2017_05_highlights_ENG_PAN.docx

Spanish: https://www.regularcapital.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/TOONLA_2017_05_highlights_SPA_PAN.docx

Portuguese: https://www.regularcapital.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/TOONLA_2017_05_highlights_POR_PAN.docx

Tooncast Latin America June 2017 Highlights

Comedy Month

Featuring comedy animation from Warner Bros. including Animaniacs, Pinky and The Brain and Freakazoid. Airs Mondays to Fridays at 6am and 6pm and weekends at 1pm.

Duck Dodgers Marathon

A two-hour Duck Dodgers marathon will air on Saturday 3rd June from 10.30am.

The Looney, Looney, Looney Bugs Bunny Movie!

The Looney, Looney, Looney Bugs Bunny Movie! airs Friday 30th June at 8pm.

Tooncast Highlights For June 2017 in .docx Format

English: https://www.regularcapital.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/TOONLA_2017_06_highlights_ENG_PAN.docx

Spanish: https://www.regularcapital.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/TOONLA_2017_06_highlights_SPA_PAN.docx

Portuguese: https://www.regularcapital.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/TOONLA_2017_06_highlights_POR_PAN.docx